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What Else Should You Say When You Say Goodbye?

What Else Should You Say When You Say Goodbye?
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Robby Berman

Robby Berman is a reporter, father, and musician who creates and discovers good stuff for the Internet world.

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When it’s time to leave a company — unless Security’s escorting you straight to the door — your soon-to-be-ex-bosses are likely to want an exit interview with you. Depending on the circumstances, your feelings about this may range from, “So long, suckas,” to, “Sure, what can I do to help?” In any event, there are some interesting things to think about, as pointed out in a new article on Examiner.com.

The first issue, the trickiest, is the tone you’ll be taking during this final conversation with the company. It’s always a good idea, of course, to leave on a positive note, but just how to do this can require some strategy.

It’s often the case that the HR department will be interested in learning things from you that can assist them in employee retention going forward. Basically, they’ll be asking you for feedback. Given that you may want a reference from an old boss or — heaven forfend — you may need to come back some day, you don’t want to use the exit interview as your forum for venting. Forbes suggests preventing by composing the bluntest, most unguarded resignation letter you can before you have your interview, and then making sure it never sees the light of day again.

In any event, since you don’t want to be put in the position of having to lie, frame any critiques in a friendly, unemotional way, as Vivian Rank, a consultant for The Society for Human Resource Management told Forbes.,“The challenge is to provide non-emotional feedback. You don’t want to rail.”

In general, to achieve a happy ending, try to limit what you say to useful information. You may want to say why you’re leaving: a better salary, or a clearer path to advancement, for example. This is all good data for HR to have. Your company may also require transition operational information from you, as noted in the Examiner article — if you can find out what they need ahead of time, the interview will go that much more smoothly.

Robby Berman

Robby Berman is a reporter, father, and musician who creates and discovers good stuff for the Internet world.

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