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The 10 Worst Craigslist Job Postings Ever

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Sabrina Son

Sabrina is the editor in chief for TINYpulse news. She's dipped her toes into various works of writing — from retail copywriter to magazine editor. Her work's been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg BNA, and Tech.co.

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Optimized-iStock_000052064746_SmallMany recruiters turn to Craigslist because it’s relatively inexpensive to post job opportunities there. Still, that doesn’t necessarily mean job seekers won’t be met with postings that make you cringe. Don’t believe it? These 10 awful Craigslist job postings speak for themselves.


 

1. The creepy ad

Screen_Shot_2015-08-31_at_2.35.29_PMSOURCE: avoidthisjob.com

If the ALL CAPS wasn’t enough of a telltale sign, it’s clear this employer isn’t looking for a gal who knows how careful you actually need to be with bleach. Whenever misogyny, sexism, and crassness ooze out of a Craigslist job post, you’ll probably want to skip to the next one.

2. The creepier ad

Screen_Shot_2015-08-31_at_2.38.02_PM
SOURCE: wordpress.com

Okay, this guy was probably trying to be really clever and off-putting. Success! Still, the ad describes an exchange of services for a payment, so one can reasonably categorize this post as a job ad. While sitting in a bathtub full of noodles does seem rather harmless, $1 is not that much money.

3. The bizarre ad

Screen_Shot_2015-08-31_at_2.54.15_PMSOURCE: craigslist.org

Ask most folks, and they’ll tell you the same thing: today’s economy is tricky, and it can be hard to find work. That said, you probably don’t want to respond to an ad seeking the services of a drunk clown. Unless you’re a professional clown and it’s quitting time.

4. The scam ad

Unfortunately, the world’s not a utopia, and if something sounds too good on Craigslist to be true, well, there’s a good chance it is. Don’t be like this guy who fell for a Craigslist scam. He ended up doing some work for no pay and getting his identity stolen. Ugh, worst.  

5. The lazy ad

Screen_Shot_2015-08-31_at_2.56.51_PMSOURCE: buzzfeed.com

Ever stumble across an ad like that where the recruiter was too lazy to even proofread what he or she posted? This is how the recruiter becomes the recruit.

6. The brief ad

Screen_Shot_2015-08-31_at_2.58.49_PMSOURCE: huffingtonpost.com

While the ad is certainly direct and to the point, the posters probably should have run the sentence by another set of eyes or two. It seems as though most “smart or more” people would probably be wise enough to avoid responding to such a listing.

7. The misspelled ad

Screen_Shot_2015-08-31_at_3.00.25_PMSOURCE: craigslist.org

At first glance, it looks like whoever posted it did so in a feeble attempt to be funny. But then you read the fine print, and voila, you’ve learned exactly why it’s so important to not rely solely on spell-check.

8. The meticulous ad

Screen_Shot_2015-08-31_at_3.01.55_PMSOURCE: craigslist.org

The more rules there are to follow, the more likely workers are to break at least one of them. In addition to being awful, this simple ad for a line cook probably errs on the side of being too descriptive. Who’s going to want to apply for a job that makes you come in when you’re sick? Better yet, who’s going to eat at that restaurant?  

9. The low-paying ad

Screen_Shot_2015-08-31_at_3.04.10_PM

In order to eat, you’ve got to work. Everyone knows that. But if you’re looking for a job, don’t just hop on anything you stumble across. This ad, for example, offers writing work that would probably end up paying somewhere in the $5/hour range. Good riddance.  

10. The ridiculous ad

Screen_Shot_2015-08-31_at_3.05.35_PMSOURCE: happyplace.com

Ever spun a sign around to attract motorists to a business? If not, it appears as though you wouldn’t be able to land this sign-spinning gig. The job poster is adamant about refusing to hire anyone to spin a sign who hasn’t done it before. Well, you could always fib and hope you pass the in-person demonstration that’s also required.

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Sabrina Son

Sabrina is the editor in chief for TINYpulse news. She's dipped her toes into various works of writing — from retail copywriter to magazine editor. Her work's been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg BNA, and Tech.co.

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