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Study Examines How Long It Takes to Get a Job at a Tech Company

Study Examines How Long It Takes to Get a Job at a Tech Company
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Dora Wang

Dora is an employee engagement reporter for TINYpulse. When she's not busy digging into and covering the latest workplace trends, she's wrangling with her three (yes, three) cats and rooting for the Seahawks.

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It may be a very good time to be looking for work if you have tech skills. According to a survey conducted by Dice.com, a record-breaking 78% of hiring managers expect to be hiring workers like you in the first half of 2016 than last year. Not that things will go more quickly as a result. In fact, according to research conducted by Glassdoor Data, it’s taking longer than it used to take to get hired — in 2009, the average hire took 3.3 to 3.7 days; now the average is 22.9 days, counting from the date of application. For software engineers, it can take up to 35 days.

The people at GetVoIP, a cloud communication advisor, have taken a look at what’s making the process so slow by studying the experience of prospective software engineers.

Of the 13 popular tech companies they studied, seven begin the long process with a phone interview. Two companies have applicants fill out an online assessment as the first step. Only one reported starting off with a Skype interview. This first step takes from two weeks to a month to set up and get done. Companies typically treat an on-site interview as the final step before hiring someone.

GetVoIP also asked applicants how they felt about the interviews themselves. With the exception of Amazon and Twitter, all of the applicants had a positive opinion of the experience. Twitter’s interview process was the least liked of all of the companies.

The most difficult interviews, GetVoIP found, were those conducted by Google, with Uber and Amazon coming in next. IBM got the nod for the easiest job interviews.

The lesson someone looking for a new job can learn from this is to calm down: Not getting snapped up immediately is not a sign of trouble. Chill, try and enjoy the process, and who knows?

Dora Wang

Dora is an employee engagement reporter for TINYpulse. When she's not busy digging into and covering the latest workplace trends, she's wrangling with her three (yes, three) cats and rooting for the Seahawks.

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