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THE TOP 7 MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT REMOTE WORKERS

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Sabrina Son

Sabrina is the editor in chief for TINYpulse news. She's dipped her toes into various works of writing — from retail copywriter to magazine editor. Her work's been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg BNA, and Tech.co.

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iStock_000063645575_Small-2Lazy, distracted, out of touch — these are just some of the stereotypes about remote workers. But the stereotypes aren’t even close to true. In fact, research has shown quite the opposite. When considering whether to allow remote workers at your own company, check out these seven most common misconceptions about remote employees. 

1. They’re more likely to be bingeing on Netflix than doing work

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There’s a stereotypical image of a remote worker lying around watching television or bingeing on the latest hot Netflix series, but that visual couldn’t be further from the truth. According to a study by Discovery, remote workers actually work harder than their in-office counterparts. Tweet: Remote workers actually work harder than their in-office counterparts http://bit.ly/1jy1Syu via @TINYpulse This can likely be attributed to fewer workplace distractions — such as lengthy, unnecessary meetings — or the fact that they are more satisfied by their jobs that allow for remote working.

 

2. They’re difficult to reach

In the modern era — with Skype, FaceTime, Google Hangouts, and so, so many more communication technologies at your fingertips, there’s no reason why a remote worker would be any harder to reach than an in-office employee.

 

3. They’re lying on the couch with their laptop all day

laptop-I-need-helpSOURCE: giphy.com

Who needs a workspace when you’re at home with your favorite comfortable couch or recliner? Well, that idea of a lounging remote worker is all wrong. In fact, many remote workers aren’t even working entirely from home. There’s always coffee shops and libraries, but remote group work spaces are becoming even more popular. They may be able to work from home, but remote workers are just as on-the-go as in-office employees.

 

4. Remote workers are women who are home with their kids

Remote employees aren’t just working mothers, despite stereotypes. In fact, men are more likely to work remotely than women are. According to Salon.com, only 23% of women reported working from remote locations, compared to 36% of men. Tweet: Only 23% of women reported working from remote locations, compared to 36% of men http://bit.ly/1jy1Syu via @TINYpulse

 

5. They’re always distracted

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Chores, errands, cooking dinner, and the ever-enticing television can be distractions, sure. But don’t underestimate the distractions that can occur in office too. Time-consuming meetings, drop-by coworker visits, noise distractions, and so many other things can take your attention away in the office. This isn’t a problem solely for remote workers.

 

6. They aren’t required to stay in touch

If there’s only one or two fully remote workers on your team, there could be a rumor running rampant across the office that these remote team members aren’t required to stay in touch with the manager. This is so far from the case. Most companies support remote workers with strong communication tools and policies, whether it’s to be on a company chat system, email, video chat, or otherwise, and these tools make communication even more open and easier. In addition, often, remote workers communicate more to fight against this stereotype.

 

7. They stay in their pajamas all day

tumblr_md37m6JzPx1r8rkiao3_250_largeSOURCE: giphy.com

Okay, well maybe some stereotypes can still be true. Some days the luxury of being in favorite sweatpants from 9 to 5 is too great a feeling to ignore for remote workers. But they’ll be the first ones to tell you that it’s not every day.

 

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Sabrina Son

Sabrina is the editor in chief for TINYpulse news. She's dipped her toes into various works of writing — from retail copywriter to magazine editor. Her work's been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg BNA, and Tech.co.

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