/  Employee Engagement  /  FOUR DESK CHAIR ALTERNATIVES TO REDUCE BACK PAIN
Employee Engagement, Life at Work

FOUR DESK CHAIR ALTERNATIVES TO REDUCE BACK PAIN

About Author
Sabrina Son

Sabrina is the editor in chief for TINYpulse news. She's dipped her toes into various works of writing — from retail copywriter to magazine editor. Her work's been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg BNA, and Tech.co.

I like it

Four Desk Chair Alternatives to Reduce Back Pain by TINYpulseThe verdict is in: those with desk jobs can develop health problems such as spinal misalignment, joint pain, neck pain, back pain, herniated discs, and more. The static posture over a period of 6-10 hours puts so much stress on your arms, legs, shoulders, and especially back that the pressure can lead to all kinds of health problems.

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke:

  • Lower back pain is the number two reason that U.S. residents visit the doctor
  • Around 80% of all U.S. residents have experienced lower back pain during their lifetimes

Clearly, the all-day sitting office environment is a huge health risk. Not only that, Hayworth reported that productivity goes up 17.5% when employees sit in an ergonomic setting in an adjustable chair. In addition to making changes like getting up for walks during the workday, employees can clearly give themselves a leg up by ditching the boring office chair that was killing their back and going for a more innovative, health-conscious option. In particular, there are four styles of new-wave office chairs to test out — because sometimes we can’t all go full-throttle treadmill desk.

1. The kneeling chair

Screen_Shot_2015-11-10_at_7.14.30_PM

A kneeling chair doesn’t mean you’re doing the praying position all day, but it does offer a seat where some stress is taken off your back and displaced to your shins to reduce strain. Employees sit in a standard position, but your upper leg, rather than parallel to the floor, is at a 60 or 70 degree angle down to where your knees and shins can rest on another support.

Kneeling chairs come in all sorts of brands with various shapes and sizes so you can find one that best suits your office look.

2. The Focal Mogo

Screen_Shot_2015-11-10_at_7.18.32_PM

Picture this: You’re sitting on what looks like a unicycle without the wheels or a pogo stick with a seat on top. Some have called it “The Human Kickstand.” The idea with the Focal Mogo brand chair is to eschew the health hazards of a full office day of sitting by changing the standard work position to a more upright position. It alleges to reduce back pain and neck and shoulder tension and also increase blood circulation. As a bonus, the Mogo is totally portable, so you can fold it up and take it to the conference room for your meeting if you need.

3. The new-wave exercise ball

Screen_Shot_2015-11-10_at_7.20.01_PM

The exercise-ball-as-office-chair has been a popular change in the last decade — even making a cameo on an episode of The Office. But today, more companies are taking that model and adding a traditional twist. Now, the exercise ball looks even more like a chair, adding a base while still keeping its “active sitting” purpose, so your abs have to work and your posture betters. For extra style and personality, check out the Pottery Barn Teen Fur Rockin’ Roller Desk Chairs.

4. Saddle seats

Rather than your traditional chair, saddle seats are — well, exactly what they sound like. Bring out your cowboy in a saddle-inspired office chair that aims to support your body in the same way you would if you were standing. Your spine keeps from slouching, reducing strain and pain and overall improving your posture, which can lead to its own health benefits.

Ditch the traditional, boring office chair, and not only will you show a little creativity and drive employee engagement, but you’ll also better your health in the process.

RELATED POSTS:

Sabrina Son

Sabrina is the editor in chief for TINYpulse news. She's dipped her toes into various works of writing — from retail copywriter to magazine editor. Her work's been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg BNA, and Tech.co.

More Posts

Follow Me:
TwitterLinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *