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Employee Retention, Life at Work

EMPLOYEE RETENTION: WHAT’S MAKING WORKERS QUIT [NEW REPORT]

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Laura Troyani

Laura is an entrepreneur and reporter. She loves helping companies spot new tips, tricks, and trends to improve their organizational culture. In her free time, you can catch relaxing with her two bulldogs.

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iStock_000018843058_Large-2What leads employees to walk out the door for good? Wouldn’t you want to know what you could do to keep your best and brightest from taking jobs from your competitors? Well, it’s your lucky day because here at TINYpulse we just released our Employee Retention Report. We surveyed 400 full-time employees across the U.S. to uncover what keeps employees satisfied and in their seats, and what makes them look for greener pastures.

Here’s just a small teaser for all the great findings we uncovered.

1. Supervisors Can Make or Break Employee Retention

We looked at how several factors impact retention, from overall manager satisfaction to respect from managers to managers’ willingness to give employees freedom to do their jobs and offer transparency.

Just look at the link we found between freedom and retention. Employees that have lots of freedom to make decisions on how to do their jobs are pretty satisfied and far less likely to think about finding a new employer. But those unfortunate souls whose hands are regularly tied are 28% more likely to think about greener pastures elsewhere (rs = -.33, p < .001, n = 400). Tweet: Employees who don't feel like they have the freedom to make decisions are 28% more likely to quit http://bit.ly/1iQzKpT via @TINYpulse

How Project Freedom Impacts Employee Retention

Click here to see what other manager behaviors help (or hurt) retention.

2. Colleagues Have a Lot of Power

Great peers can make or break an employee’s work experience … and can be the difference between staying on board and looking for a new job. We found that peer respect and recognition play significant retention roles. For instance, when we asked employees about the amount of appreciation and recognition that they get from their peers, those citing low levels of recognition were 11% less likely to plan on staying put (r = .24 , p < .001, n = 400). Amazing, right? Tweet: Employees who don't receive recognition are 11% less likely to stay at the company http://bit.ly/1iQzKpT via @TINYpulse

How Peer Recognition Impacts Employee Retention

Click here to see how colleague relationships help (or hurt) retention.

 

3. Culture Matters a Lot

We were floored by how much factors like workplace culture and how employees fit in at work impact someone’s likelihood to stay with their organization. Just look at the relationship between work culture and frequency of thinking about a new job. Employees who give their work culture low marks are nearly 15% more likely to think about a new job than their counterparts (rs = -.31, p < .001, n = 400). Tweet: Employees who gave their culture a low score are 15% more likely to think about looking for a new job http://bit.ly/1iQzKpT via @TINYpulse

How Company Culture Impacts Employee Retention

Click here to see how work culture helps (or hurt) retention.

 

4. Don’t Forget Rest and Relaxation

All work and no play makes for dull boys and girls … or in the case of workplaces, it makes for employees that are ready to quit! Employees that are tired and burnt out are 31% more likely to think about looking for a new job than their colleagues who feel comfortable with their workload (rs = .35, p < .001, n = 400). Tweet: Burnt out employees are 31% more likely to think about looking for a new job http://bit.ly/1iQzKpT via @TINYpulse

How Burn Out Impacts Employee Retention

Click here to see how work/life balance and vacation help (or hurt) retention.

 

5. Your Team Wants to Grow … or They’ll Leave

Professional growth opportunities aren’t just a nice-to-have. They are a need-to-have. Employees that reported having access to either internal or external professional development were more than 10% more likely to stay with their current employer (F(1, 398) = 26.80, p < .001, partial η2 = .06). And lacking cross-training results in employees being 10% less likely to stay (F(1, 398) = 15.80, p < .001, partial η2 = .04). Tweet: Employees that have access to professional development were 10% more likely to stay put http://bit.ly/1iQzKpT via @TINYpulse

Impact of Professional Development on Employee Retention

Click here to see how professional growth opportunities help (or hurt) retention.

Are you ready to see what other factors you should focus to keep retention numbers up? Check out our complete Employee Retention Report.

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Laura Troyani

Laura is an entrepreneur and reporter. She loves helping companies spot new tips, tricks, and trends to improve their organizational culture. In her free time, you can catch relaxing with her two bulldogs.

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