/  Best Companies To Work For  /  BEST COMPANIES TO WORK FOR: COSATTO
Best Companies To Work For

BEST COMPANIES TO WORK FOR: COSATTO

About Author
Sabrina Son

Sabrina is the editor in chief for TINYpulse news. She's dipped her toes into various works of writing — from retail copywriter to magazine editor. Her work's been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg BNA, and Tech.co.

1

Uncomfortable conversations in the workplace are never fun and often tricky to navigate. Yet, without these talks, companies lose the opportunity to build cultures of openness, transparency, and accountability.

To make these conversations easier and less stressful, companies are turning to employee engagement platforms where workers can anonymously communicate their thoughts on anything work related. Yes, that’s right — anything.

Meet …

cosatto

Cosatto, a company that manufactures high-quality push chairs, travel systems, and car seats, wanted their organizational culture to stay as open as possible but knew how uncomfortable employees often felt having these hard talks.

This inspired Cosatto to start sending out anonymous surveys. Steve Green, Finance Director of Cosatto explains:

“We also wanted a way to measure things on a regular basis so we could keep track of the natural ups and downs of employee happiness.”

With the assurance and veil of anonymity, employees feel more confident sharing feedback and suggestions with their employers — all while skipping the awkward, uncomfortable part.

Cosatto can attest to this.

How to Air Out Employee Feedback

After implementing anonymous surveys, Cosatto employees started sharing feedback on things like the company’s open-plan layout and their thoughts on tidiness around the office.

“These are the kinds of issues that people may have been reluctant to bring up before,” Green said.

In turn, employers are given an opportunity practice what they preach by addressing employees’ concerns and suggestions. Green mentions:

“If we just surveyed everyone but didn’t do anything about their feedback, they would stop responding. By acting on their input, we show the team that we’re really invested in them, and it keeps them invested in continuing to offer feedback.”

Uncomfortable conversations don’t need to be seen as awkward, nail biting interactions. After all, honest feedback — however uncomfortable to hear — is essential to the health and success of any company culture.

Sabrina Son

Sabrina is the editor in chief for TINYpulse news. She's dipped her toes into various works of writing — from retail copywriter to magazine editor. Her work's been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg BNA, and Tech.co.

More Posts

Follow Me:
TwitterLinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *