/  Life at Work  /  Bad Software and Bad Tech Training Is Costing Companies $1.8 Trillion
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Bad Software and Bad Tech Training Is Costing Companies $1.8 Trillion

Bad Software and Bad Tech Training Is Costing Companies $1.8 Trillion
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Robby Berman

Robby Berman is a reporter, father, and musician who creates and discovers good stuff for the Internet world.

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Cary, N.C.-based IT firm Samanage has just released its State of Work Survey Results. The study asserts that U.S. business are losing as much as 1.8 trillion annually due to software issues.

Samanage surveyed 3,000 workers in January 2016, and found a number of software-related issues, among which was respondents’ calculations that they waste about 520 hours a year on repetitive tasks that could be automated, provided they had the software to do it. (This is the source of the 1.8 trillion figure.)

Employees also complained about slow networks, and collaboration software proved to be specially problematic. For one, thing, 17.4% didn’t even know what collaboration software their company uses, while a surprising 63% said they collaborated via email, an antiquatedly slow method that doesn’t facilitate team discussion that way that chat programs like Slack or Yammer do. Only 7.2% of respondents use chat software at work.

Another issue is that one in five employees have downloaded apps that haven’t been vetted by their IT departments — this is a dangerous problem to have, both for company security and for prevention of viruses and malware. It may have something to do with the fact that 36.8% think that their company’s software — that is, IT-sanctioned apps — are outdated. 12.2% want more mobile-friendly tools and 9.5% think greater cloud access to their document would be useful.

Clearly there’s often a troubling disconnect between IT departments and employees, and insufficient training in how to leverage what their apps can actually do for them. This may lie at the heart of problems the survey uncovers. When employees aren’t properly taught how to master their software, IT is overwhelmed with support requests. As IT struggles to get through the workload, they wind up further infantilizing employees by implementing a quick fix without educating the employee on what’s happened before racing on to the next support request.

Software — on the desktop, in mobile devices, and in the cloud — offers companies and their employees amazing new capabilities. Maybe we just need to slow down a bit to make sure we all know how to use it.

Robby Berman

Robby Berman is a reporter, father, and musician who creates and discovers good stuff for the Internet world.

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